Introduction

The Cryologger is a low-cost, open-source datalogger and telemeter based on the Arduino platform (www.arduino.cc) and built using easy-to-use, do-it- yourself electronics. Code for the Cryologger was written using the open-source Arduino integrated development environment (IDE) and compiled from community generated libraries.

Cryologger tracking beacons being prepared for deployment from the CCGS Amundsen.

Motivation

Reliance on expensive and proprietary commercial data acquisition and telemetry systems can inhibit both researchers and citizen scientists and present a significant barrier to the establishment of widespread monitoring networks. The development of low-cost, open-source instrumentation can greatly reduce the cost of scientific research, improve the spatial density and coverage of collected data, and produce new ways to observe and monitor the cryosphere.

The goal of the project is to determine if open-source dataloggers and telemeters, comprised of low-cost, off the shelf components, are capable of supporting the physical measurement needs of a variety of cryospheric scientific applications.

Deployment

In the summer of 2018, during Leg 3 of the 2018 CCGS Amundsen Expedition, six Cryologgers configured as tracking beacons were successfully deployed by helicopter on icebergs and ice islands along the coasts of Ellesmere Island and Baffin Island.

As of March 1, 2019, all six Cryologgers have achieved over 6 months of continuous operation, transmitting a total of more than 4000 messages via the Iridium satellite network and travelling a combined distance of over 2000 km. Beacons can be tracked in real-time at the following link: https://cryologger.org/tracking

Preliminary results have demonstrated it is possible to design and build a low-cost data logging and telemetry system capable of withstanding the harsh conditions of remote polar regions.

Successful deployments of Cryologger ice tracking beacon deployments (left) and transmitted location data from Cryologger 1 between September 6 and January 1, 2019 (right). Total track distance is approximately 400 km.

Development

Development of the Cryologger is led by Adam Garbo, a Research Associate in the Water and Ice Research Laboratory (WIRL) at Carleton Unviersity, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

As of March, 2019, work on the next version of the Cryologger is currently underway.